Archive for the ‘Abortion Prevalence’ Category

Rhythm Calendar = Team Patay

Details Published on Wednesday, 03 April 2013 00:00 Written by DAHLI ASPILLERA

Poor women relying on the Romano Fertility Rhythm Calendar have too many unwanted, unplanned pregnancies. They are regular clients of back-street illegal abortionists.’

MANY of my relatives and friends, mass-going, communion-taking devout romanos, in fact have always used condoms, IUD, vasectomy, tubal ligation, contraceptives (not abortifacients, which are illegal and cannot be prescribed by physicians; are unavailable except from herbal quacks).

Because the well-off can afford to buy dependable means to space their pregnancies, they never have to seek illegal abortionists. The only romanos who must seek the services of abortionists are impoverished women who have no money for food, much less for expensive commercial contraceptives.

Without money for contraceptives, poor women have to believe in the priests’ Fertility Rhythm Calendar. These women, raped by a husband, resulting in repeated unwanted and unplanned pregnancy. These poor women are the regulars at the illegal abortionists.
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(Video) Abortion Agony in the Philippines

Uploaded by AlJazeeraEnglish on Aug 2, 2010

Although abortions are strictly illegal in the Philippines, the medical procedure to terminate pregnancy flourishes in underground clinics.

Given their illegal and unregulated nature, risky procedures are often followed at the clinics, endangering lives.

According to the US-based Centre for Reproductive Rights, more than half a million women risk their lives annually by undergoing backstreet abortions.

Out of them, about 1,000 die each year.
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(Video) Philippines Tears of Illegal Abortions and Over-population of Manila Undercover News P2

Uploaded by tmck8032 on Mar 20, 2009

In the next 30 years the population of the Philippines is set to double to 170 million. Contraceptives are frowned on and abortion is illegal , every year more than half a million Filipina women are so desperate they undergo harrowing illegal abortions, despite the fact that at least 80,000 end up seriously ill in hospital.

Metro Manila, where 35% of its 12 million inhabitants live in slums. Not many of them have jobs and many women are desperate to avoid large families which they cant support.

The Filipino Catholic church holds rallies against abortion and it is backed by wealthy American pro-life groups such as Operation Outcry. The Christian Right in the US is pushing the Bush government into stopping foreign aid to clinics giving contraception advice.

Remy whose two previous attempts at abortion ended in failure. Pregnant with a third child, she was so desperate she took bitter herbs, threw herself out of a window then massaged her abdomen until she started bleeding.
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(Video) Philippines Tears of Illegal Abortions and Over-population of Manila P1

Uploaded by tmck8032 on Mar 20, 2009

In the next 30 years the population of the Philippines is set to double to 170 million. Contraceptives are frowned on and abortion is illegal every year more than half a million Filipina women are so desperate they undergo harrowing illegal abortions, despite the fact that at least 80,000 end up seriously ill in hospital.

Metro Manila, where 35% of its 12 million inhabitants live in slums. Not many of them have jobs and many women are desperate to avoid large families which they cant support.

The Filipino Catholic church holds rallies against abortion and it is backed by wealthy American pro-life groups such as Operation Outcry. The Christian Right in the US is pushing the Bush government into stopping foreign aid to clinics giving contraception advice.

Remy whose two previous attempts at abortion ended in failure. Pregnant with a third child, she was so desperate she took bitter herbs, threw herself out of a window then massaged her abdomen until she started bleeding.
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Abortion in the Philippines: A National Secret

By Carmel Crimmins
MANILA | Wed Sep 5, 2007 9:32am EDT

(Reuters) – Minda is a masseuse with a difference. Her caress is used to abort fetuses.
The 50-year-old grandmother has lost count of the number of pregnancies she has terminated in this largely Roman Catholic country where abortion is illegal and strictly taboo, but where about half a million women end their pregnancies every year.

The backstreet abortions performed by healers like Minda may become more common as a United States government aid program plans to stop distributing contraceptives in the Philippines in 2008. This will leave birth control up to the government which under the influence of Catholic bishops advocates unreliable natural birth control methods rather than the pill and condoms.

Most women who seek abortions are like Remy, married with several children and too poor to afford another baby.

The petite 44-year old, who declined to give her last name, paid 150 pesos ($3) for a hilot, or traditional midwife like Minda, to crush her three-month old fetus using rough strokes and pincer-like grips on her belly.

The procedure, which can also involve pounding the lower abdomen to trigger a miscarriage, is called a massage.

“I felt guilty but I thought it was better than having another child that will only suffer because we have no food,” she said in an interview in a slum on the outskirts of Manila.

Remy bled for a week after her session with the hilot, passing out with the pain. She refused to let her husband take her to the hospital because of the shame of what she had done and because they couldn’t afford the medical bills.
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Philippines Abortion Crisis

By Carlos H. Conde
Published: Monday, May 16, 2005

MANILA — Built in the late 1500s by the Spaniards, Quiapo Church is one of the most prominent symbols of Roman Catholicism in the Philippines.

Located in the center of Manila, right along a busy boulevard with side streets teeming with bootlegged DVDs, Filipinos who pray for miracles flock to this church. Inside is a supposedly miraculous life-size statue of Jesus carrying the cross.

To hundreds of Filipino women every year, Quiapo Church provides a solution – some say another kind of miracle – to a specific predicament: unwanted pregnancy.

Every day, pregnant women go to this church not only to pray but to buy abortion drugs from the dozens of stalls that surround it.

“You could say we provide instant miracles to women,” said a 58-year-old vendor, who agreed to talk on the condition of anonymity.

For years now, the woman said, she has been selling herbs and certain abortifacients right outside the church’s main entrance, barely 20 paces from the Monument for Children, a representation of a fetus outside the womb, cherubs, Christ’s wounded hands and a sobbing mother.

Today, Quiapo Church has become almost synonymous with abortion. It is a testament not only to a people’s abiding faith but also to one of the more tragic facts in Philippine society, where abortion is illegal and the Roman Catholic Church condemns any woman who has one. But more and more women are undergoing abortions, and more and more of them are dying because abortions are largely clandestine and unsafe.
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(Book) Estimating the Level of Abortion In the Philippines and Bangladesh

International Family Planning Perspectives
Volume 23, Number 3, September 1997

By Susheela Singh, Josefina V. Cabigon, Altaf Hossain, Haidary Kamal and Aurora E. Perez

In countries where data on induced abortion are underreported or nonexistent—such as the Philippines and Bangladesh—indirect estimation techniques may be used to approximate the level of abortion. The collection of data about women hospitalized for abortion complications and the use of such indirect estimation techniques indicates that the abortion rate in the Philippines is within the range of 20-30 induced abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-49, and the rate in Bangladesh ranges between 26 and 30 per 1,000. About 400,000 abortions are estimated to occur each year in the Philippines, while the number in Bangladesh is calculated to be about 730,000. Some 80,000 women per year are estimated to be treated in hospitals in the Philippines for complications of induced abortion; in Bangladesh, about 52,000 women are treated for such complications, and another 19,000 are treated for complications resulting from menstrual regulation procedures. The probability that a woman will be hospitalized for abortion complications in the Philippines is twice that in Bangladesh, probably because menstrual regulation procedures by trained providers account for about two-thirds of all voluntary pregnancy terminations in Bangladesh.

(International Family Planning Perspectives,23:100-107 & 144, 1997)

Regardless of the legal status, accessibility or safety of induced abortion, information about it is essential if health planners are to ensure that women’s reproductive health is protected. However, reliable information on abortion is extremely difficult to obtain in many parts of the developing world.1 Although the problem is most severe where the procedure is highly restricted by law, there are a number of reasons why the procedure is often underreported, even in countries where abortion is legally permitted under broad conditions. Providers may not report all of the procedures they perform, an official system for recording abortions may not exist or may be incomplete, and women may not always acknowledge an abortion.
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